The Killer Cancer of the West: The Colorectal

Facebooktwitterlinkedinrssyoutubevimeoinstagramby feather
Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Introduction:

Colorectal cancer, also known as colon cancer, is a cancer that starts in the colon or large bowel and could extend to the rectum, the end of the large intestine. Blood in stool, change in the bowel movements, weight loss, feeling weak and tired are the common signs and symptoms. Although genetic or family history of colon cancer and colon polyps, is currently considered the principal risk factor, only a small fraction of the population, 5-25% only have such a history. But constipation specially in old ages when the large bowel like many other parts of the body is more vulnerable and weak, and mostly occurs as a result of diet high in meat and low in fiber increases the risk of colorectal cancer. Other diseases of the small and large bowels such as inflammatory bowel diseases, including Crohn’s disease and Ulcerative colitis, and also polyps of the large bowel could increase the risk of colorectal cancer. In fact the cancer often typically starts as a polyp and a benign tumor that over time grows and spreads and becomes a killer cancer. Globally, colorectal cancer is the third most common type of cancer making up about 10% of all cases, with about 1.5 million new cases and 700,000 deaths per year, and the second leading cause of death from cancer in the the developed or Western societies. Colorectal cancer is one of the few diseases that is more common in developed countries than the developing or under-developed lands that carry most of the human’s diseases due to infections, poor hygiene, poverty and insufficient medical care. (1-3)

 The Normal & healthy Colon:

The normal function of the colon is fermentation of undigested food remnants such as starch and protein in order to extract energy from otherwise indigestible carbohydrates, production of vitamins, to absorb water and electrolytes and to transport waste products (feces) to the rectum for excretion/defecation. Food remnants, intestinal secretions, digestive juices and exfolated intestinal cells are metabolised by the bacteria (microbiome) in the colon. (4) In the bottom of each colonic crypt, 4-6 stem cells give rise to the enormous amount of colonocytes and host the potential of accumulating genetic and epigenetic changes. (5) As a result of the ongoing and rapid proliferation, the colonocytes move from the lower parts of the crypts up towards the colonic lumen at a speed of approximately 1 cell position per hour. When colonocytes reach the luminal surface they are exfoliated. Thus, a crypt is fully renewed in 2-8 d. The total proliferation rate is 3-10 billion colonocytes per day. This makes the colonic mucosa the organ with the highest proliferation rate of all organs in mammals. The rapid replication of cells require a readily available supply of nutrients for tissue synthesis and the process is very responsive to dietary changes. (6)

Read the full text here:

The Killer Cancer of the West: The Colorectal

Facebooktwitterlinkedinrssyoutubevimeoinstagramby feather
Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Protected by WP Anti Spam